Plugging Screw Holes and Gluing the Ponsi

The countersunk screw holes on the sides of the kantele were filled with walnut plugs. These were hammered in with a little wood glue using a wood block to protect the instrument. Would I be able to build the kantele using a construction method that required countersunk screw holes? At first, I didn’t know how feasible it would be to do this. I certainly didn’t want to have holes in the side of the instrument unless they could be filled or plugged. I knew there were specialized tools that could drill holes and make plugs that would match, but I didn’t want to buy another specialized tool. I was relieved to find that I could purchase pre-made plugs that could fit the holes for the size screw head I would use.

Picture of fitting and aligning the grain of the walnut plugs (to the degree possible) before gluing and hammering into place.

Fitting and aligning the grain of the walnut plugs (to the degree possible) before gluing and hammering into place.

The ponsi was carefully placed and glued to the top of the instrument. All surfaces were then carefully sanded to prepare for the finish coats.

Picture of gluing the ponsi to the top of the kantele. The tape was used to indicate the position without having draw on the top with pencil

Gluing the ponsi to the top of the kantele. The blue tape was used to indicate the position without having draw on the top with pencil

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